Remembering Justice Antonin Scalia

Along with all Americans who love freedom and revere our nation’s Constitution, the NCLL mourns the sudden death this weekend of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. President Ronald Reagan appointed Justice Scalia to the court in 1986. As an “originalist” (one who believes the Constitution needs to be preserved as our Founders intended) and as a “textualist” (one who believes that courts should make rulings based on what the Constitution actually says, not what others might want it to say), “Nino,” as he was called by his many friends and admirers on both sides of America’s ideological divide, was a larger-than-life figure on the Supreme Court. Justice Scalia stood by his constitutional principles and refused to compromise, supporting his positions with his legal brilliance and indomitable but often scathing wit. His stalwart defense of America’s Constitution will be difficult, if not impossible, to replace.

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NCLL Leads “Dream Team” to Protect Prayers in Jesus’ Name Across America

Attys. David C. Gibbs III and Barbara Weller appeared at the Fourth Circuit Federal Appeals Court in Richmond, VA, yesterday for oral argument in a legislative prayer case in which the National Center for Life and Liberty has been defending Rowan County, North Carolina, since 2013. Appearing at court along with Gibbs and Weller were Rowan County Commission Chair Greg Edds, his wife, Kim, and half a dozen members of a “dream team” the NCLL had assembled for the occasion. Several members of the team have clerked for various Supreme Court justices, including Justices O’Connor and Scalia.

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When Religious Organizations Can No Longer Be . . . Religious

A few weeks ago, a Boston judge was preparing to issue the first decision of its kind anywhere in the United States: a decision declaring that a religious school must hire a gay man married to his gay partner, despite the school’s objection to homosexuality and same sex marriage. The Catholic school had offered the man a job as food services director, but upon learning that he was a homosexual and was married to his gay partner, they rescinded the job offer in light of the fact that his lifestyle did not align with the school’s religious beliefs.

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Want Your Charitable Deduction? Give Us Your Social Security Number.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS), which has come under fire in recent years for its treatment of conservative nonprofits, proposed a rule last year that would ask nonprofits to collect the social security numbers of its donors. The NCLL and many of its supporters vehemently opposed this regulation and became an integral part of the tremendous public outcry against it. The result? The IRS backed down and withdrew the proposal a few days ago—and for good reason.

Read more: Want Your Charitable Deduction? Give Us Your Social Security Number.